Card Image 1

Emma Johnson

Age 19, Hookup

Card Image 2

Sophia Martinez

Age 22, Single

Card Image 3

Isabella Davis

Age 21, Single

Card Image 4

Mia Garcia

Age 19, Searching

Card Image 5

Olivia Rodriguez

Age 21, Available

Card Image 6

Ava Hernandez

23, Single

Card Image 7

Emily Lopez

Single & Searching

Card Image 8

Charlotte Gonzalez

18, Single

Card Image 9

Amelia Wilson

21, Boys & Girls

Card Image 10

Harper Anderson

Accept any gender

Card Image 1

Emma Johnson

Age 19, Hookup

Card Image 2

Sophia Martinez

Age 22, Single

Card Image 3

Isabella Davis

Age 21, Single

Card Image 4

Mia Garcia

Age 19, Searching

Card Image 5

Olivia Rodriguez

Age 21, Available

Card Image 6

Ava Hernandez

23, Single

Card Image 7

Emily Lopez

Single & Searching

Card Image 8

Charlotte Gonzalez

18, Single

Card Image 9

Amelia Wilson

21, Boys & Girls

Card Image 10

Harper Anderson

Accept any gender

Forget vacuums, Dyson’s new WashG1 cleaner is like a car wash for your floor

Forget vacuums, Dyson’s new WashG1 cleaner is like a car wash for your floor

With years of successful suction-based cleaners under its hi-tech belt, Dyson has taken a left turn with its latest launch. The WashG1 is a wet cleaner that doesn’t suck at all but instead uses water and rollers to massage the dirt off your hard floors.

Dyson has dabbled in wet cleaning before—the Submarine vacuum cleaner had an attachment that also enabled it to tackle hard floors with water—but this is the first dedicated machine designed only for this purpose. Based on the time I had to test out the WashG1 ahead of its announcement, it certainly looks promising.

The brand recognizes that many people now have hard floors in their homes – some countries don’t really use carpet at all, and felt it was time to address the floor type in a more serious way. On starting research, the engineers discovered that suction wasn’t cutting it (probably a bit of a pain for the company that made its name creating the best vacuum cleaners on the market). 

Apparently, suction-based cleaners tend to clog easily, be difficult to maintain, and, crucially, expel nasty smells while they’re working. The engineers devised another approach: a triple-pronged attack of ‘hydration, agitation and separation.’

(Image credit: Future)

Two sets of rollers – one with microfiber and another with nylon bristles – agitate the dirt on the floor, aided by water running through the cleaning head. A mesh layer inside siphons off the solid debris from the dirty liquid to stop it from clogging the machine and simplify disposal. Solid waste collects in a little tray above the rollers, ready to be slid out and tapped into your bin, and dirty water cycles into the dirty water tank on the front of the stick, which is transparent, so you can marvel at how disgusting your home is. 

The microfiber is high-density, absorbent, and grippy, clinging on to as much dirt as possible, as well as controlling the overall wetness of the experience and minimizing splashback. As with Dyson’s vacuums, the cleaner head can pivot in any direction and lies low to the ground so you can easily navigate furniture, pets, children, and other obstacles. The rollers also run edge-to-edge, so you can get closer to what you’re cleaning. One of the complaints we had in our V15s Detect Submarine review was that it could leave streaks along the edges of the floor, but it looks like Dyson has addressed the issue here. 

Dyson WashG1

(Image credit: Dyson)

Another Submarine flaw that seems to have been fixed here has to do with an occasionally leaky dirty water tank. Here, it’s fully sealed with a screw lid, so you’d really have to make an effort to spill anything. It’s designed to be used with just water, but you could add a floor cleaner liquid if you wanted. 

The WashG1 will work on any hard floor, and you can manually select from three different hydration levels to suit the surface you’re trying to clean or opt for a no-water option. Additionally, Dyson has added a max mode for even more water (the engineers found this was the most efficient way to tackle stubborn stains). 

Screen showing mode in use on Dyson Wash G1 handle

(Image credit: Dyson)

Following its recent trend for adding a little screen to anything and everything (looking at you, Dyson AirStrait), you’d find a display on the top of the WashG1’s handle. It’s used to show instruction graphics that will be useful the first time you use the device and redundant from that point onwards, and it also tells you which hydration mode you’re currently using.

Cleaning your cleaner

If you use water, you need to be especially mindful of keeping your cleaner clean. To this end, Dyson has added a two-minute self-clean cycle that can be activated when your WashG1 is back in its dock. It runs clean water through the rollers and drys everything off a bit, and it is intended for everyday maintenance. 

You can also remove the rollers for a proper deep clean. These can be replaced as required (how often this is required is obviously dependent on use, but they are designed to last at least six months, even if you’re a complete clean freak).

The Dyson WashG1 will have a list price of $699.99 / £599.99 / AU$999. It’s due to launch ‘later this year’ in most markets but Aussies can buy it directly from Dyson Australia starting May 14. 

You might also like…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *